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Single parenthood is easy! We have glamorous homes, hot romances and fabulous adventures. OK, maybe not necessarily, but thanks to Hollywood, at least we can dream.

I’m the mom of two grown girls, who I raised mostly on my own, and I’ve also been doing movie reviews for 19 years as the Screen Queen, a syndicated radio personality.  Below, my 10 favorite totally unrealistic single parent films.*

Tiara rating system: ♔ ♕ ♚ ♛

*(If you’ve missed ’em, click the titles to buy or stream this weekend!)

Panic Room

Because every NYC single parent can afford a fabulous apartment.

The Upper West Side realtor says the three-story brownstone has everything… high ceilings, palladium windows and even a panic room which is a hidden chamber built as a sanctuary in the event of break-ins.
What the realtor doesn’t tell newly divorced Meg Altman (Jodie Foster) is that the very chamber to hide in happens to be housing a safe with $3,000,000 that burglars are after.
Suddenly Meg and daughter Sarah (Kristen Stewart’s) first night at their new digs turn into a nightmare.
Enter (literally) Burnham (Forest Whitaker), Raoul (Dwight Yoakam) and Junior (Jared Leto) in a cat and mouse game that will have the audience on the edge of their seats. As the burglars’ frustrations mount so does our tension. One burglar is the guy who designed the alarm system, one is trigger-happy and one was a deceased man’s caretaker. The movie delivers the right amount of thrills and chills with Foster delivering as much steam as she did in Silence of the Lambs. Her kid is a mini Foster-in-the-making and Whitaker pulls off a sensitive bad guy role with ease. : ♔ ♕ ♚

Maid in Manhattan

Because every single parent hotel maid can land a rich husband.

Marisa Ventura (Jennifer Lopez) is a single mother working as a maid at a first-class hotel in Manhattan where she “strives to be invisible.” By a twist of fate, and mistaken identity, Senate hopeful Christopher Marshall (Ralph Fiennes), runs into her thanks to the help of her mischievous son Ty (Tyler Garcia Posey).
While the heir of a political dynasty and a maid from the Bronx may seem like worlds apart, they are really just a subway ride away, because apparently what defines who we “are” is not what we do for a living. It’s been a long enough time since America’s favorite romantic comedy, Pretty Woman, and this one seems to pull out all the same sappy punches. Stanley Tucci is adorable as the bumbling assistant to the senator and the late Natasha Richardson is well-cast as the blue-blood teeth-gritting princess in the Grand Suite. Lopez gets to play (appropriately) a New Jersey type girl who lacks the sophistication or luster of a Julia Roberts, but is still charming to watch in this predictable fairy tale. But it’s Fiennes who steals the Richard Gere role with charming, lighthearted, understated and almost Gary Cooper-ish style. And we thought Fiennes couldn’t step out of his Merchant and Ivory type roles.  ♔ ♕ 1/2

Mamma Mia!

Because every single mother wants all her ex boyfriends to show up and claim her child as their own!

Two daughters and three Broadway versions of Mamma Mia later, I was reluctant to have to sit through the movie version on the big screen. But then I’m reminded of the success of Chicago and Hairspray and figured it couldn’t be too bad.
With colorful scenery and energized actors from the get-go, this movie is capable of doing things that set changes and curtain calls can’t accomplish. Not to mention, turns out that Meryl Streep, in the lead role as Donna, Hollywood’s Oscar winning royalty, can be adorable and silly, dance and even sing.
If you’ve seen the show on stage, then you know what you’re in for, but if you live in the middle of North Dakota and will never make it to Manhattan, this might be just the ticket, in the story of a young woman, Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) about to married but has one question…who’s your daddy? So she sends old-fashioned letters to three potential candidates from her mother’s love life past.
Enter Colin Firth, Pierce Brosnan and Stellan Skarsgaard as the three men who want to know the answer to the same question. Of course a simple DNA test would have solved the problem but then we wouldn’t have a movie that makes us want to jump in the aisles and join in the cast’s infectious enthusiasm. And when you’re tearing up in the sentimental moments, you’ll even be tempted—the minute the credits roll—to call your old, radical girlfriends from the disco days. That is if you’re old like me. Christine Baranski and Julie Waters do a fabulous job as Streep’s silly sidekicks. The musical “is what it is,” and it is…three tiaras: ♔ ♕ ♚

Love Actually

Because we can all find love, actually…in a few weeks right before Christmas and live happily ever after.

It’s four weeks before Christmas in London. Hugh Grant is a Tony Blair-ish prime minister to an arrogant Billy Bob Thornton as president. Liam Neeson is a recent widower raising his stepchild. Colin Firth finds his wife in bed with his brother, while Alan Rickman and wife Emma Thompson are a bit shaky. Together the multiple tales weave into a lesson that no matter what age or timing in life, it’s never too late for love. Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill) teams with Grant to lead the pack of lovelorn skits. The one of aging perverted rock star (Bill Nighy) steals the show with attitude like, “Kids, don’t buy drugs—you can get them for free!” While it’s a lot of overjoy and overkill in storylines that come off more as one-liners than a cohesive force, it doesn’t matter. The over-the-top ending will send you reeling several times over as each plot soars beyond Pretty Woman or Officer and a Gentleman to their multiple endings. You’ll cry, you’ll laugh and in the end you’ll realize that all that really matters, is love, actually. ♔ ♕ ♚1/2

Step Brothers

Because all stepchildren will apparently behave like an SNL skit.

Will Ferrell loves his goofball topics and losers (newscaster, basketball player, ice skating champs) often based in the 1970s. But in Stepbrothers he sinks to an all-time lovable low as a 40-year-old mama’s boy, Brennan, who still lives home with his mother (Mary Steenburgen).
On the other side of town, another 40-year-old, Dale (John C. Reilly) lives with his father (Richard Jenkins) so it seems obvious the single parents would find themselves a match made in heaven.
After the wedding, the usual (and then some) sibling rivalry begins, until (of course) the two find some connection that makes them instant best friends. This occurs after Ferrell is instructed never to touch Reilly’s drum set, but he does, and with body parts you have to imagine. The plot gives new meaning to the word “manchild” but beyond that, it taps into every single thing a boy in middle school might say or do, to another boy, but at the same time taking the usual fart, toilet and in this case, some new childish humor, to all time highs (or lows). Adam Scott plays the perfect evil brother to Farrell, coming off as Tom Cruise and looking a little like him, too. Stepbrothers is not as bad as you might suspect probably because it’s helmed by Judd Apatow (producer) and directed by Adam McKay (Talladega Nights) though it feels more Farrelly Brothers than Knocked Up.
The beauty of this one is how Ferrell and Reilly really seem to enjoy themselves with their shocking one-liners, nasty cursing, whining, hitting and slapping. It’s one of those Dumb and Dumber-style American comedies that has a little more umph! than other summer comedies. ♔ ♕

Taken

Because every single father can win over his teenaged daughter’s affections by acting like James Bond.

The movie Taken gives new meaning to a dad telling his teenage daughter “call me when you get there.” Bryan Mills (Liam Neeson) is a retired spy who left his James Bond job to be closer to his daughter, Kim (Maggie Grace). But Daddy can’t compete with Kim’s new lifestyle—a life of luxury in Beverly Hills where she resides with her stepdad and her mother (Famke Janssen).
But when Kim and her friend decide to hightail it off for a summer in Paris, all hell breaks loose and suddenly Daddy’s spy skills come to the rescue. The writer/director team of Mark Robert Kamen and Luc Besson knows this style of story full of damsels-in-distress, prostitutes and underdogs—they did the Transporter movies.
And even though there are times in this particular story that you might want to say “now wait a second here,” the plot pretty neatly crosses all its T’s and dots its I’s (like when the dad tells his daughter “my international number is plugged into your phone” so we understand why Kim should be able to dial him so easily). The ticking clock of a middle-aged father finding his daughter within 96 hours lest she falls into the hands of the white slave traders, coupled with Neeson’s Jason Bournesque skills, make for a highly entertaining/edge-of-your-seat/pedal-to-the-medal popcorn flick. ♔ ♕ ♚

Things We Lost in the Fire

Because after you become a widow a hot guy will show up out of the blue.

After several flops, it’s good to see Halle Berry back on Oscar-worthy-track in a performance as a widow of two children who hates Jerry (Benicio Del Toro), a junkie who shows up at her husband (David Duchovny’s) funeral. Her husband has been murdered and she’s rendered frozen and helpless yet eventually able to find a common bond in this man (Del Toro) who inspires her to take one day at a time, while she inspires him to have a reason to live.
And so the movie becomes one of mutual dependency—two people who are struggling to stay “in the now.” This is Del Toro’s movie, as he delivers a performance better than his Oscar-winning Traffic—sensitive, funny and unintentionally charming, which might explain why at times the audience can’t gauge when it’s appropriate to laugh or be still. Nevertheless, the movie touches us with a different plot line that ends very realistically yet at the same time fulfills us as an audience. ♔ ♕ ♚

Trouble with the Curve

Because it’s just never too late to get along with Dad and win a World Series.

Gus (Clint Eastwood) is a failing baseball scout. His eyes aren’t what they used to be, so his daughter, Mickey (Amy Adams) named for Mantle follows him on his Carolina mission to find a pitcher, the one with the right curve ball. Mickey is an attorney by day, who tried to do the right thing to impress a father who was never emotionally there for her, but now she’s emotionally unavailable to him, tapping away on her Blackberry. To him, this is a strange world. He’s stuck (circa 1990s) in his world of newspapers and typewriters. Clint played a similar curmudgeon-y character in his film Gran Torino.
Pete (John Goodman) plays a sympathetic colleague who understands the rules of the game while Phil (Matthew Lillard) doesn’t want to believe the old guy anymore…a guy who hears the curve of the ball but can barely see it.
Enter Johnny (Justin Timberlake) a former recruit of Gus’s, who possesses the right dose of humor, kindness and the family-real traits Gus wants in his daughter’s future husband. Johnny’s a former Fenway Park guy who got traded, and it “bothered Gus as much as it bothered me,” he says. Now he’s scouting for the Red Sox.
It’s wonderful when a good film begins to swirl, all the components of script, director and actors effortlessly playing off each other’s performances. In this case, Timberlake’s softness to Adam’s iciness, maintaining an old-fashioned gentleness of baseball films past. How often can a movie do well without the crutch of slang, blood and blowups?
Somewhere along the way Eastwood’s medical issues get cast aside, but this is this year’s Moneyball. The film falls into a league of feel-good baseball greats, and Clint doesn’t talk to any empty er, bleachers. Instead, the old man scores again. But more 
importantly, Clint finally did a movie where he didn’t take his shirt off. He left that, thank God, to Justin Timberlake. ♔ ♕ ♚ 1/2

Waitress

Because as long as you can bake pies and screw your gynecologist, you, too, can end up happy.

Old Joe (Andy Griffith) owns a pie shop where he frequents the same booth every day run by his three feisty waitresses. One is PMS-y, bold and highly opinionated (Curb Your Enthusiam’s Cheryl Hines), one is demure, homely but hopeful (the late Adrienne Shelly), and one is the unhappily married and knocked-up (Keri Russell). But that’s okay, because she’s having a fling with the cute new town doctor (Nathan Fillion) who also happens to be her obstetrician. He’s in love with her pies and she’s his little tart, if you catch my drift.
The surprising thing about this movie’s dreams, hopes, and thrills of the affair, is that it had one of the worst movie trailers in history, yet that trailer turned into one of the best movies of the year. There is nothing that can describe how special a little and thoughtful film this is. And there is nothing more bittersweet than knowing the movie’s writer and director Adrienne Shelley—who also starred as one of the waitresses—was brutally murdered in November of 2006 and never lived to see this hit the big screen.
A movie that will leave you teary-eyed and reminiscent of that special someone, just after you’ve come down off the thrill of remembering heated love. ♔ ♕ ♚ ♛

Under the Tuscan Sun

Because why not just say, “Screw it, I’m leaving my whole life behind and buying a villa in Tuscany!”

Diane Lane gets dumped by her husband for a younger woman, loses her house in the divorce settlement and decides to take a tour of Italy. Upon falling into Tuscany, she gets off the bus, buys a house (just because the old-woman seller likes Lane despite her lowball price) and falls in love and survives. She doesn’t have a child, but she adopts a community and plays single parent to an Italian villa in wine country: ♔ ♕ ♚ ♛

 

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ASK LINDA, PSYCHOTHERAPIST & CHOICE MOM:

My ex-partner and I share joint custody of our 12-year-old son, but now she’s stopping me from having any contact with him. Every time we agree on a visit, she doesn’t show up. And now she’s no longer returning my phone calls. I’ve taken to dropping by her house – we live only two blocks apart – but she never answers the door. I bought my son a cell phone so we could communicate despite her interference, but he stopped returning my calls after I introduced him to my new partner a couple of weeks ago. What should I do?

Linda answers:

First of all, it’s really important not to let a custody dispute like this go on because it could set a precedent that might be hard to reverse. It sounds like your ex is doing something called triangulation –that is, using your son as a wedge between you and her, and making him feel that he has to choose between the two of you. He may think that by returning your calls he’d be betraying her and even possibly lose her love. But I also suspect he’s crying out for you to make a bold move and break the stalemate.

Even though your son is young he should have many choices. However, whether or not he sees you, his parent, is not one of his choices. I would suggest that you show up at his school on a regular basis to pick him up, which joint custody gives you the right to do. You could email him and arrange to meet three days a week. Regardless of his reaction or behavior (he may lash out or freeze you out), be there to love him, to be a role model, and to give him a sense of consistency, which will make him feel safe and comfortable.

It seems like you’ve been trying to avoid going the legal route with your ex, which is understandable. But if she continues to refuse to let you see your son, contact the court so they can advise you on the process for initiating legal proceedings against her. The family court system offers free legal counsel and is there to help you through the whole process. It may seem scary, but it won’t necessarily be a prolonged fight. They generally put you in a room with you ex and try to mediate a solution rather than taking your case before a judge.

HAVE A QUESTION FOR LINDA? Sent it to info [at] singlewith.com, and put ASK LINDA in the subject heading. She may use your question for an upcoming post!

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Photo by  Marcel Strauß on Unsplash

How to get your groove back

I’ll never forget one night in the mid-80s, when my attempts at dating as a newly-single mom of a grade-schooler reached a low point. I got my daughter into bed, welcomed the babysitter, went in my room to prep for my 9 p.m. drinks-date, lay down on the bed to ponder my outfit… and the next thing I knew, the babysitter was shyly asking for a ride home. It was midnight, and I had slept right through the date.

Single parent dating has changed in some respects since then; for one thing, today I would have gotten an angry text from my date demanding to know why I was standing him up. But other things have not changed one iota.

When you’re a single parent, you are the sun and the moon in your family. Your kids depend on you for everything—from homework help to meals to driving duties to costumes for school plays. It can be exhausting. And, if you’re a good parent, you’re often a bad dater. As in, you rarely carve out the time for it, because your family comes first.

“Dating when you are exhausted from parenting is challenging,” says Ellie Slott, author of Mom, There’s a Man in the Kitchen and He’s Wearing Your Robe and Dating for Dads. “But as anyone who dates knows, a new, exciting romantic relationship infuses us with boundless energy. So go for it.”

It’s also true that you can’t parent well—or even effectively—if you’re feeling exhausted, and resentful because your own needs aren’t being met. Denying yourself social interactions can just hasten burnout. Everyone needs “me” time, which means time with sweethearts—or potential sweethearts.

Fisher recommends online dating, because “Anyone can do it, and in your PJs no less!” and points out that when you enter the dating world, there is a lot of incentive to pull your life together. “Making the decision to date means taking care of yourself, eating well, exercising and looking your best. It can really lead to a healthier lifestyle.”

As for other places to meet single parents, Fisher suggests trolling for dates at kids’ activities. “Consider an activity with your kids that includes the parents. Say a daytime haunted hayride or a children’s book reading in a local bookstore. Granted the likelihood any single person you meet will also be a parent—but who better to appreciate your exhaustion?”

Fisher also recommends, “timing your dating opportunities to coincide with your kids’ sleepovers and friends’ birthday parties.  Skip the nap you are craving; instead, fix yourself up and go on a date.”

This all sounds reasonable, but the issue is energy. How can single parents increase their mojo, so they have some left over at the end of the day for romance? Here are some tips:

Get up earlier—but not so you can start on your chores

Set your alarm for 15 minutes early. When it goes off, instead of leaping out of bed, spend some time thinking about what you’re grateful for, and the wonderful things in your life. Or write in a journal—or engage in any other activity that makes you feel centered. You’d be surprised at how it increases your energy!

Set aside at least one night a week just for you

Whether it’s for a date, for a movie, for volunteer work or time with friends, you’ve earned it. And you’ll feel refreshed afterward!

Make sure your kids get to bed at the same time every night

This is harder when they get older, but it’s impossible to carve out some quiet time in an evening at home for reading, a good movie or pursuing a hobby when your kids are lobbying (loudly) to watch Letterman.

Don’t deny yourself grooming appointments

You might feel selfish getting that pedicure rather than volunteering to bring cupcakes to the soccer game, but you’ll also feel great afterward. Twenty minutes on your own getting your feet massaged is worth 20 naps.

Instead of eating lunch at your desk, take a walk

It’s tempting to skip lunch or chow down at your desk when you’re anxious to get home to your kids. But a light meal followed by a brisk walk can be enormously renewing and recharging.

Turn shower time into spa time

You don’t need to spend a fortune at a spa to feel rejuvenated. It’s possible to get any number of fabulous aromatherapeutic products at a local natural foods store that are inexpensive and make your shower feel like a spa treatment. Turn off the noise in your mind and breathe deeply.

Tune in to the quiet

Whether you’re driving or cooking or getting dressed, the tendency is to have a radio or TV on for background noise and for quick hits of news. This is especially true while driving. Turn everything off and just be still, at least once a day, and you’ll notice your stress level decrease.

Okay, now look at your calendar, call the sitter, accept that online invitation, and put on your dancing shoes.

Featured photograph by bombardier

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ASK LINDA, PSYCHOTHERAPIST, SINGLE MOM:

Dear Linda,

My husband was the love of my life. Or so I thought. We’re divorcing after 12 years together and I just can’t stop crying. I want to pull it together for the kids, but I often am just overcome with grief. I feel like my best friend – and my life plan – have both died. To make it worse, the kids are reacting to the tension and are acting out. Which just adds to the stress and sadness and makes it harder for me to hold it together. How I can cope?

Linda answers:  

I am so sorry that you are going through this major loss. Your grief, tears and feeling overwhelmed are normal for the trauma you have suffered. These emotions are part of the mourning process, which will eventually lead you forward in your life. The “airplane safety demonstration” provides a key life lesson on the importance of taking care of yourself during a crisis such as this. The flight attendant says, “Put your oxygen mask on before placing an oxygen mask on your child.” Why? If you do not take care of yourself, you will not be here to take care of your children. When you have a major life stressor, you might forget to take care of yourself.

Your kids feel your pain and stress and are having their lives turned upside down, too. Talk with them. Let them know it is OK to feel sad. It is OK to cry. It is OK to be angry. Explain that both your emotions and theirs are real and that it is OK to feel whatever they feel. Here is the tricky part: What you do with your emotions is where you have choices. To help overcome difficult emotions, MOVE: exercise, play physical games, go skating, biking, running, play kickball, or play hide and seek. Move and get those feel-good chemicals activated in your body. Also, make sure you are all eating well and getting enough sleep.

Often when emotions become overwhelming, you might get caught up with repetitive thoughts and get “stuck in your head.” One simple and great technique for moving through these emotions is to start naming all the colors that you see. You can do this by yourself or with the kids. Try this for about 5 minutes, when you or they start to feel overwhelmed. It’s a mindfulness trick, sort of a mini meditation break: When you are concentrating on the colors and their names, you cannot simultaneously stay trapped in your negative thoughts.

Divorce or breakup is a loss, and you will need to mourn. It takes time, but you are a survivor and you and the children will come through this. A qualified family therapist might help guide you through this process together. I recommend that you seek out this kind of support for yourself and your children, since it will help you to “normalize” and move through the mourning process.

HAVE A QUESTION FOR LINDA? Sent it to info [at] singlewith.com, and put ASK LINDA in the subject heading. She may use your question for an upcoming post!
DID YOU LIKE THIS POST? Please go to the Singlewith Home Page for much more, and sign up for our weekly newsletter in the box (above, right)! You’ll get great new essays, advice and ideas by and for single parents, coming to your email inbox. Also, register for our Singlewith Forums, to become part of our community and start connecting and getting support from fellow single moms and dads. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter (@singlewith) and Instagram (singlewithphotos). In short, JOIN US!
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ASK LINDA, PSYCHOTHERAPIST, SINGLE MOM:

My ex-wife was awarded primary custody of our 6-year-old son, over my strong objections. I wanted 50/50. Now I’ll suddenly only see him on weekends. We have a very close relationship and I am furious about the situation, my ex’s behavior and the judge’s decision. My son’s going to wonder why I don’t want to see him much anymore. How can I talk to him about this without getting into all the bitterness and anger of the custody dispute, or making him mad at his mom? I don’t want him to think that I don’t want to be with him!

Linda answers:

First of all, I’m sorry that you are in this situation. It must be very difficult for you to not be able to see your son first of all on a daily basis and secondly only on the weekend.
The ideal resolution for this situation would be for you and your ex to sit down and agree how to discuss this with your son. If you had trouble doing that on your own, I would suggest reaching out to a professional therapist in order to mediate the situation.
Again, ideally you would want to agree and discuss boundaries about visitation and how you would jointly communicate this to your son.
If your ex-wife will not agree to discuss this with you, you can only control your side of the equation. Calmly outline to your son that you love him and Mommy loves him. In the discussion with him, make it clear whatever the judge has declared. Also, make it clear to him that you cannot change the situation because the judge has made a legal decision. Although the boundaries may be clear to you, he may be very confused. Always remember that boundaries mean safety for children. Let him know about his space in your home. Involve him in making it his place. Begin new traditions together in your new home. Think about today and and not the past. You can make this an exciting new adventure for both of you!
Also think about setting up regular times to Skype or FaceTime with him during the week in order to keep consistent contact. You can watch movies together, play games, chat,do homework, or even just be in the same room through technology, so that you can maintain consistency in one another’s days.
HAVE A QUESTION FOR LINDA? Sent it to info [at] singlewith.com, and put ASK LINDA in the subject heading. She may use your question for an upcoming post!
DID YOU LIKE THIS POST? Please go to the Singlewith Home Page for much more, and sign up for our weekly newsletter in the box (above, right)! You’ll get great new essays, advice and ideas by and for single parents, coming to your email inbox. Also, register for our Singlewith Forums, to become part of our community and start connecting and getting support from fellow single moms and dads. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter (@singlewith) and Instagram (singlewithphotos). In short, JOIN US!
Photo by  Marcel Strauß on Unsplash

Take some time to play!

I have discovered the Fountain of Youth and it lives in my apartment. It goes by the name of Scott and strongly resembles a 6-year-old boy. My downstairs neighbors will tell you that instead of a soothing tinkle, this fountain sounds like stampeding herd of elephants. But he does help me feel young by providing me with a powerful drug.

Don’t worry—the drug’s all-natural. Dopamine, straight from my own brain. I get it because Scott gets me to be more playful than I would normally be and persuades me to try new things. Both of these activities stimulate your brain to produce more of the neurotransmitter dopamine, which makes you feel happy. And—for me at least—happy feels younger. Play also stimulates the development of new neurons, so even if my body looks its age, Scott helps my brain stay young. (Check out this article by my friend Margaret on all the benefits of play.)

Case in point: At the beach this past summer, Scott started doing forward rolls in the surf. “Try it!” he urged, his scalp full of sand. “It’s really fun!” I did not think it would be fun in the slightest. But, what the heck, I did it just to humor him. You know what? It was, as Scott would say, really, REALLY fun, sort of a cross between body-surfing and riding a rollercoaster. The sand washed out of my hair eventually. (If you called it an organic exfoliating scalp treatment with Atlantic sea salt, it would probably sell.)

A more recent example: I came home tense with stress last night, and Scott asked me to play air hockey. “I have to fix dinner,” I told him. “Pleeeeeeeeeease?” he begged. So I played a few games. We did one with a hex bug skittering all over our mini air-hockey table as interference (“Level 2 air hockey,” Scott called it.) By the end of 3 games, I didn’t need that glass of wine so badly and I started dinner in a much better mood.

The responsibility and logistics can feel overwhelming. But the fact that we have kids also gives us a secret, scientifically proven weapon to fight all that single parent stress. Don’t forget to play with them!

What’s your destress secret? 

DID YOU LIKE THIS POST? Please go to the Singlewith Home Page for much more, and sign up for our weekly newsletter in the box (above, right)! You’ll get great new essays, advice and ideas by and for single parents, coming to your email inbox. Also, register for our Singlewith Forums, to become part of our community and start connecting and getting support from fellow single moms and dads. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter (@singlewith) and Instagram (singlewithphotos). In short, JOIN US!

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It takes a village to get all-important Top Ten lists right, right? At least we in the SingleWith control room think so. Thank heavens, then, for List.ly, the YouTube of lists where your 2¢ still has value!

Add your top single parents to the list below then walk around all day proud in the knowledge that you made a difference!

[listly id=”3Y4″ theme=”light” layout=”full” numbered=”yes” image=”yes” items=”all”]